• Michael Field

100 Episodes: A Forgotten Cinema Conversation


100 Episodes - Forgotten Cinema Podcast

Field

100 Episodes, Butler. We’ve sat on either side of a desk or table, staring into each other’s soulful eyes talking about movies. Honestly, I can’t even make a joke about it feeling like 100 years, because it simply doesn’t feel that long. Maybe it’s because we’ve been talking about movies for so long while at the day job. Do you feel the same? Maybe you don’t. Maybe you can’t stand it anymore. I don’t know.


Butler

I can’t stand YOU maybe, but I’ll never not love talking about those moving pictures. All jokes aside, it really doesn’t feel like it’s been one hundred (and one; I’m looking at you unreleased “Sphere” pilot) episodes.

We’ve been talking about movies together for the better part of a decade now (gross...old) and it’s always a blast to talk about movies with someone knowledgeable, but not snobby about them and to talk about films that not everyone has seen; even if we do argue about things...often.


I’m also proud of us. We came up with an idea and executed it. We didn’t overthink it, or give up. We’ve never missed an episode, and out of this podcast we’ve done the commercials, bonus episodes, upcoming video projects, and even an entertainment company! It all sounds like putting on airs and self congratulations, but screw it! You know me, I’m always my harshest critic and I think being able to identify both the awesome and not-so-awesome in our work is an important part of our continued improvement and evolution.

Mike Field and Mike Butler from the Forgotten Cinema Podcast

Field

One day, we’ll release that Sphere episode. One day. Our age difference of 12 years is one of the more interesting aspects of our podcast, because we’ve experienced these films at different points in our lives and that makes for some great conversation. You grew up with the Star Wars prequel trilogy and I watched Star Wars: A New Hope when I was 2 years old. Of course, I remember nothing! According to my parents, I was in the lobby crying for most of it.


I remember telling our friend and third member of the Forgotten Entertainment corporate structure, of which I just made up, Pat Whalen, that ever since we started the podcast in 2019, this has been the longest stretch of time where I’ve made the most content in my entire life. Everything you mentioned from the podcasts to the commercials. And now, we’re about to produce, write, create and edit two video series for other partners. That’s what I’m most excited about. Building the brand that has become Forgotten Cinema.


Butler

I agree. This podcast has become a way for us not only to discuss our love of film, but to also use as a vessel to explore and create new projects and to start branching out and actually doing the types of things we’ve wanted to be doing for years; or at least adjacent to them.


Our upcoming content will help to strengthen our FC brand and show people more of us and what we can do. We joke about it in the commercial we did for Popstar, but 100 episodes for a podcast really isn’t that long a time, and we’ve already started to accomplish a lot and go in a different direction than I think most casts do, and in taking this “road less traveled” I’m excited to see how far we will have come after the next 100.


Field

Just to finish that thought, I think it’s very easy in podcasting and in any creative endeavor to grow complacent. It’s very easy to go from “Hey, let’s do a podcast” to then actually do a podcast, but it’s much harder to go from “Let’s get more views and downloads” to actually getting those large numbers. There is no magic formula except putting in the work, doing the research and trying different avenues of brand awareness. We could easily be satisfied with our output and sometimes we each need to push the other to get going, which I think also helps us to keep this thing going.


In these past 100 episodes, what are some moments that stand out to you? For me, I’d say our Lost World vs. Indiana Jones 4 fight as well as my complete shock that you’ve never seen (and still haven’t seen) True Romance. Our musical commercial for Oliver & Company to which I’m going to need voice lessons if we do that again.


Butler

I think our fight about David Lynch and the ending for No Country for Old Men is a great moment in FC Podcast history. Our Clue commercial and the one where we couldn’t figure out a commercial idea are two of my favorite commercials. This 100th episode also features some moments where I was actually laughing while editing; from the very beginning of the podcast, to the argument about me not watching “The Expanse” (I’m obsessed now) and Siri telling you to shut up. These are some of the things that make us stand out from the average movie review podcast and help keep the hundreds of hours of editing I’ve done fresh and fun. And don’t worry Mike, a musical commercial is coming. I don’t know when, but soon enough…


Field

I feel vindicated that you love The Expanse after I spent countless hours pleading the show’s case to you. Makers of The Expanse! Sign us up to do your podcast! All others pale in comparison.

Maybe there’s some YouTube videos where they teach basic voice lessons. I’m not some fancy actor like you where you need to take the same training courses that all other actors take so the back of the headshot has the same training classes. Oh yeah, I’ve held auditions before. I know the drill.


I know we teased our future a bit in the beginning and I’d like to expand on that. (No pun intended, Holden) For the next 100 episodes, I’m interested to see how we grow as a brand, not just as a podcast. The podcast is a great base for us to work off from and is a big reason why we’ve partnered with Row8 and Best Ever Channels to create original video series, reviewing content from their catalogs. The chance to have our brand seen by, potentially, 40 million subscribers on Roku, Amazon Fire and more is a fantastic opportunity. I view these shows as only the beginning to what we can do. And while we’re definitely podcasters, that’s only a facet of who we are. We’re content creators. In all forms.


Butler

Exactly. We’re also actors, writers, directors with a wealth of creativity, and stories to tell. All of this is just the start of our “Forgotten” journey. Here’s to 100(,000) more!


Field

Well said...